Can I monitor all 4 sources (SUM, ANALOG, DAW, CD) simultaneously?

No. Up to 3 maximum. To monitor from up to three sources simultaneously (instead of the default single source), first enter setup mode. To enter setup mode press the mono and alt spkr buttons simultaneously. Both switches will flash alternately indicating that the D-Box is… READ MORE Can I monitor all 4 sources (SUM, ANALOG, DAW, CD) simultaneously?

Do I need to leave blank rack spaces above/below my gear?

Dangerous gear does not get extremely hot. However, we always recommend leaving blank spaces anyway. More ventilation always equals longer gear life, no matter how hot or cool your gear runs. Do not rack your Dangerous gear next to very hot gear such as power… READ MORE Do I need to leave blank rack spaces above/below my gear?

Do I still use “Bounce to Disk” to record my mixes when using Dangerous Summing?

No- with Dangerous Summing, “Bounce to Disk” is unnecessary. Instead, record your mix into your DAW in real time by taking a pair outputs from your 2-Bus+ and plugging them into 2 line inputs on your interface. Once this mix has been recorded onto a… READ MORE Do I still use “Bounce to Disk” to record my mixes when using Dangerous Summing?

How do I get the output of the talkback mic by itself?

The talkback mic feeds the headphone output independently. This means that if you turn down your headphone output, but turn up your talkback level, you will hear just the talkback through the headphone output.

How do I hook up more than two pairs of headphones?

Each headphone output provides 20 watts of clean, high quality amplification. There is plenty of juice to feed headphone distribution boxes like the Redco Little Red Cue Box. Depending on the impedance of the headphones utilized, the headphone output can handle up to 16 sets… READ MORE How do I hook up more than two pairs of headphones?

How does the quality of the D-Box compare to other Dangerous products?

The D-Box is made with all the same components as all Dangerous Gear. The summing section is identical to the 2-Bus (but cut in half), and the D/A and monitoring paths are mostly the same as what can be found in our other gear.

I want to hear two sources at once, how do I do that?

To monitor from up to three sources simultaneously (instead of the default single source), first enter setup mode. To enter setup mode press the mono and alt spkr buttons simultaneously. Both switches will flash alternately indicating that the D-Box is waiting to set the input… READ MORE I want to hear two sources at once, how do I do that?

Is there any sonic difference between the 2-Bus and 2-Bus LT?

No. The price difference is strictly based on extra features and the labor to hand wire items like individual XLR vs. DB25 connectors and the added cost of 16 boost switches, a stepped attenuator and custom power supply.

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Jack

Engineer

“I bought a bunch of gear, which got me to 80%. Then I researched this little gem out, and the rest is analog history for me. It’s like I poured glue all over my mixes. Fat, Warm, Depth, Clarity and Punch. Did I mention Fat?… READ MORE Jack

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Josh Hayward

Engineer/A&R, Astral Plane Studios

“Everyone is loving the LT. Even my clients are getting more motivated to deliver, so it’s affecting creativity and drive!”

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Marc Bauman

Engineer, House Recording Studios

I use my Dangerous 2-Bus LT on every mix. It instills a certain clarity and openness to the balance that is hard to achieve when mixing strictly in-the-box. All the tracks seem to sit more comfortably in their own niche. The 2-Bus LT is a… READ MORE Marc Bauman

Should I just use it for mixing?

No. The summing mixer should be utilized throughout the entire process from mic placement to mastering. For example, don’t cloud the mic selection process by listening through a bottleneck; reveal all the detail, punch and stereo width throughout the entire project.

Should I use it while tracking?

Absolutely! The summing mixer should be utilized throughout the entire process from mic placement to mastering. For example, don’t cloud the mic selection making process by listening through a bottleneck; reveal all the detail, punch and stereo width.

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Steven Miller

“I love the D-Box. No other unit that I’ve seen accomplishes what it does. Between the monitoring, headphone amp and summing mixer, it makes my job increasingly easier; and the music I make sounds 100-times better.”

What is the CD Input for? Can I plug in an iPod there?

The CD Input is a digital input (AES/SPDIF) that utilizes the D-Box’s mastering-grade D/A converter for monitoring. This allows you to listen to songs through the same converter and at the same reference level as your mix. You can plug in any device that has… READ MORE What is the CD Input for? Can I plug in an iPod there?

What is the difference between a stepped attenuator vs a pot?

A stepped attenuator (As found on Monitor ST, Monitor, and 2-Bus) is more accurate and repeatable. It switches resistors of varying values into the audio path, which have no inductance. A potentiometer (as found on the D-Box, 2-Bus LT, etc) on the other hand, creates… READ MORE What is the difference between a stepped attenuator vs a pot?

Where are all the faders and pan pots on the summing mixers?

Every additional component in the signal path degrades your music, and makes recall more complicated. True summing bus devices differ from mixers: they do not have faders, aux sends etc… they simply sum your audio together, while preserving all the functionality of your DAW! If… READ MORE Where are all the faders and pan pots on the summing mixers?

Why do my buttons sometimes latch and other times they don’t?

“They function based on what we call “”momentoggle””. There are two modes: momentary and latching. In LATCH MODE, if a button is pressed and released quickly, it will lock. In TOGGLE MODE, if a button is pressed and held for more than a second, the… READ MORE Why do my buttons sometimes latch and other times they don’t?

Why do things get louder when I press the Mono Button?

Mono sums the left and right channels together. If anything is out of phase between the two channels, they will boost each other, thus making the mix quieter, or losing specific instruments. This button is there to help ensure that the mix is “in phase”… READ MORE Why do things get louder when I press the Mono Button?

Why do things get quieter when I press the Mono Button?

Mono sums the left and right channels together. If anything is out of phase between the two channels, they will cancel each other out, thus making the mix quieter, or losing specific instruments. This button is there to help ensure that the mix is “in… READ MORE Why do things get quieter when I press the Mono Button?

Why is the DAW button louder/softer than the SUM button?

When switching between DAW and SUM on the D-Box, you are switching between 2 different D/A converters- the converter in the D-Box, and the converter in your interface. Different converters will be calibrated to different reference levels, therefore one may be louder than the other.

Why should I use summing? Why not just mix in my software application?

Mixing in the box has inherent limitations, identified by users as: spongy, collapsed image, no headroom, lack of detail and zero punch. Much like traditional vintage consoles brought together multiple streams of audio, the 2-Bus receives 16 analog outputs and combines them to stereo. It… READ MORE Why should I use summing? Why not just mix in my software application?